Friday, March 23, 2018

Friday Video: A Moving Panorama of the Mississippi Valley

Friday, March 23, 2018
Loretta reports:

Many of the 1830s magazines I peruse include reviews of recently installed panoramas (please scroll down for the review about Niagara Falls). The moving panorama is also a large painting, but where the panorama requires the viewer to move around a room, the moving panorama is an early "moving picture." Using spools, it scrolls across a stage, creating the illusion of traveling along a scenic route.

Before photography and movies, both the still and the moving paintings offered Londoners as well as Americans views of distant locales. Since the Londoners seem to have been especially curious about the U.S. and its wildernesses, I’m sure they would have enjoyed John J. Egan’s “Panorama of the Monumental Grandeur of the Mississippi Valley”—all 348 feet of it, and a very rare survivor.


Video: John J. Egan's "Panorama of the Monumental Grandeur of the Mississippi Valley"

Credits Animation: Paul Caro Photography: Saint Louis Art Museum © 2015 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image is a still from the video.
Readers who receive our blog via email might see a rectangle, square, or nothing where the video ought to be. To watch the video, please click on the title to this post or the title of the video.

4 comments:

Stephanie said...

Wow, thank you for sharing this. I knew there were mounds/villages but I had no idea how many there had been.

Steph from fangswandsandfairydust.com said...

This was so intersting - my question is about how much is real. The colossus in the river and in the rock,...

Loretta Chase said...

If you click on the title to the video, you can find a detailed description on YouTube. The description calls it an "interpretation," based on archaeological information. I haven't been able to find more details about the painting. That demands more research than I can spare time for. But you might want to try the St. Louis Art Museum or check the Met site, where there could be material I missed. To me it appears to be a combination of what's actually there plus what apparently was there much earlier. Good question. I'm sorry I don't know the full answer.

Loretta Chase said...

I meant, what was actually there about 1850...

 
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