Sunday, October 19, 2014

From the Archives: Queen Victoria's Baby Tooth Brooch, 1847

Sunday, October 19, 2014
Isabella reporting:

Yes, it's that finish-the-infernal-manuscript time again, and so for today I'm sharing a favorite post from our archives. 

I'll freely admit that I'm as sentimental as most mothers, and that like a lot of us, I squirreled away my children's first lost baby teeth as mementos. They're tucked in my desk, inelegantly sealed in business envelopes, preserved for...something.

But then, I'm not Queen Victoria (1819-1901).

When Victoria's oldest child, the Princess Victoria, Princess Royal (1840-1901), shed her first baby tooth, it, too, was preserved, though not in a lowly envelope. The seven-year-old princess's father, Prince Albert (1819- 1861) tugged the tooth free himself in 1847, while the royal family was visiting Ardverikieby Loch Laggan, as a guest of the Duke of Abercorn. As a memento of both the enjoyable visit (Victoria was so smitten with Scotland that she soon purchased Balmoral Castle as her own retreat in the Highlands) and to commemorate the landmark event in Princess Vicky's young life, Albert had the tooth made into a special brooch, left, for Victoria. Set in gold, the tooth forms the blossom of a gold and enamel thistle, the symbolic wildflower of Scotland. A "private" piece of jewelry as opposed to royal jewels for state occasions, the small brooch had never been shared with the public until 2010, when it was included in the Victoria & Albert: Art & Love exhibition at Buckingham Palace.

It's easy to dismiss a brooch featuring a baby's tooth as one more example of slightly macabre 19th c. taste, but in some circles, such mother's jewelry is still made and worn. Check out actress Susan Sarandon's custom-made bracelet, featuring her children's assorted baby teeth as the charms.

Above: Brooch, gold, enamel, & tooth, 1847. Commissioned by Prince Albert for Queen Victoria. Photo copyright The Royal Collection.


TerriSue said...

Since I didn't "discover" you until recently I found this post delightful. Thank goodness for deadlines.

Donna Hatch, Regency author said...

I'm a pretty sentimental mom. I have lots of photos and a few little outfits, and even locks of hair of my children. I was never tempted to keep a baby tooth though--that seems gross. Keeping a child's baby tooth in a box or envelop is one thing, but wearing them on my bracelet like Susan Sarandon or a brooch like the queen is kinda creepy. But to each his (or her) own.

Lauriana said...

I'm pretty sure one of my grandmothers had a small pendant with the first baby teeth of each of her four children. And I know my mother considered having a small piece of jewelry made with ours. She didn't though.

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