Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Fashions for June 1877

Tuesday, June 3, 2014
View at source here
View at source here

Loretta reports:
As promised, here are more Victorian fashions, this time from a couple of decades later than last time.

“This season Fashion decrees that that dresses are to be narrower than ever; one gets into them how one can; Style consists in having the garment fit as closely as possible and to do so underclothing is reduced to almost nothing.”*

Our readers will probably take issue with “almost nothing,” (more on this topic here) since the fashionable woman of 1877 is wearing a chemise and/or camisole, drawers (or combination—combining drawers and chemise) crinoline, petticoat, corset, and maybe more underneath, but probably not a bustle … yet.  Our Victorian underwear experts are welcome to clarify what went on in what order.


Fashion place description source text is here, where you can enlarge further for easier reading.  I have not yet found a way to combine the two fashion plate pages without degrading the image, so you'll have to imagine the Fig. 3 dress in one piece.




*C. Willett Cunnington, English Women’s Clothing in the Nineteenth Century.
(To my frustration, the author is haphazard about attribution for the quotations; otherwise, being a nerd, I would of course provide the original source.)


3 comments:

Michelle Hamilton said...

Loretta, your description of the 1877 underclothing is slightly wrong. The crinoline, otherwise known as the hoopskirt, had been out of fashion for at least a decade. By 1877 it is the era of the bustle, though by this period the Natural Form had become fashionable. A fashionable lady would have worn combination underwear, corset, bustle, and petticoat(s). Compared to the number of petticoats, drawers, and chemises, a lady wore a decade earlier to the Victorian it was like wearing virtually nothing underneath. Check out Truly Victorian patterns to get a sense of the changing fashions of the crinoline and bustle eras. There were a number of fashion trends that changed the size and shape of the bustle during the bustle era.
Michelle L. Hamilton, author, "I Would Still Be Drowned in Tears": Spiritualism in Abraham Lincoln's White House.

LorettaChase said...

Yes, Michele, I see I read too hastily. The book shows crinolines and crinolettes in the early 1870s, but thereafter speaks of petticoats and bustles. The chemise, combination, and camisole business is also confusing--doubtless because I haven't really studied undergarments of this period as closely as for the 1830s. Thank you for helping us make sense of all this!

Elinor Aspen said...

I covet that black dress. Maybe someday I'll have someone make one for me.

 
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