Thursday, May 24, 2012

In honor of those who served

Thursday, May 24, 2012
Loretta reports:

Memorial Day will be observed in the U.S. on Monday, and the parties & sales will run through the weekend.  But many of us will take a moment to reflect on what this day means. I had time and reason to reflect a short while ago, during a visit to Tuscany, when I went with my husband & friends to the Florence American Cemetery and Memorial.

The headstones, which are set in curved rows on the hillside, “represent 39 percent of the U.S. Fifth Army burials originally made between Rome and the Alps. Most died in the fighting that occurred after the capture of Rome in June 1944. Included among them are casualties of the heavy fighting in the Apennines Mountains shortly before the war's end. On May 2, 1945 the enemy troops in northern Italy surrendered.” 

You can learn more about this and other American Cemeteries at the American Battle Monuments Commission website.  For more about the cemetery in Florence, click here.

And now I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves.


























7 comments:

Susan Stessin Cohn said...

Thanks for remembering. My Dad fought in Merrill's Marauders in WWII and was never the same. So many that did make it home were changed forever.

Susan Stessin Cohn said...

Thanks for remembering. My Dad fought in Merrill's Marauders in WWII and was never the same. So many that did make it home were changed forever.

Anonymous said...

Thoughmy husband didn't die in battle, his time in Vietnam during Tet, didn't help his health. He loved military history. We visited American military cemetaries in France and Luxemburg. The place in France had the names of many of the airmen who were shot down over the English channel. My husabnd all of a sudden came across the name of a distant cousin there. We took pictures to send to his parents who were somewhat comforted to know that his name was written somewhere.
We saw where Gen. Patton was buried. His cross is at the head of the other markers as though to show that even in death he was leading them.
Military cemetaries are usually well kept and peaceful. Still, they often make me want to cry for all the wasted lives.
"In Flanders Field the Poppies blow between the crosses down below that mark our place."

flchen1 said...

Thank you--I recently read a WWII story, and that made this time so much more real. Thank you for reminding us of the magnitude of the sacrifices.

Anonymous said...

The author of the poem, below, a Canadian doctor, was killed within two weeks of writing the poem.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow, between the crosses, row on row, that mark our place, and in the sky, the larks, still bravely singing, fly.

We are the dead. Short days ago,
we lived and breathed, felt sunset's glow, loved and were loved, and now we lie in Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe. To you with failing hands we throw the torch. Be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die, we shall not sleep, although we lie, in Flanders fields.

Anonymous said...

Thank you,as ever you got class!

Donna Seger said...

Thanks for taking us here, and for remembering.

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