Monday, October 24, 2011

Early This Morning in Colonial Williamsburg....

Monday, October 24, 2011

Susan reporting:

Can't resist sharing this photograph. I'm back in Williamsburg, VA this week, where Indian Summer is in full flower. But while the days are warm, the nights are cool, meaning that there's a wonderfully mysterious mist every morning at dawn. I especially like walking through Colonial Williamsburg early in the day, before anyone else is about, and with that mist to soften the edges, you can almost – almost – imagine it's 1770 instead of 2011.

7 comments:

Rebecca said...

I would be right there with you if I could. I know you will enjoy it for all of us distant citizens of revolutionary city.
What is this picture of? Is it one of the less fimiliar buildings behind the House of Burgess?

Heather said...

I hope to visit Williamsburg some day, along with many other sites in Virginia. There's so much history!

Susan Holloway Scott said...

Rebecca, it's on Duke of Gloucester Street looking towards the Capitol, which is hidden by the drooping branches. The King's Arms Tavern and Shield's Tavern are just out of the picture on the right, if that helps with your bearings. :)

Nancy said...

What a beautiful photograph. Williamsburg is one of my most favorite places on earth and your photograph makes me miss it. Thanks for sharing.

Hels said...

When I was visiting the USA years ago, a friend hired a mini bus and took a small group around Colonial Williamsburg.

I was afraid it was going to be a Disneyfied historical theme park since, during the restoration, nearly a thousand original Williamsburg buildings were destroyed. Nonetheless it works as a living museum. We foreigners had a terrific time :)

Kevin said...

The building is the Red Lion if I am not mistaken.

Susan Holloway Scott said...

Hels, I'm so glad you enjoyed CW - you made quite a journey to come here.

I'm afraid that the "nearly a thousand original buildings destroyed" isn't quite right. I believe it was closer to 300, and that group included structures like gas stations, garden shacks, and modern shops. Any buildings considered to have architectural merit but that didn't fit into the 18th c scheme were moved to another location.It does get a bit hazy today determining original 18th c buildings from the new, recreated ones, but CW doesn't try to pass off new for old. In fact, though the original restoration/recreation began in the 1920s, the process is ongoing. Currently under construction (and using 18th c building techniques and tools) is the recreation of a larger blacksmith shop and munitions foundry, and recently they also recreated a well-known 18th c coffee house.

For lots more info about the founding, check out this article: http://www.history.org/Foundation/general/introhis.cfm

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