Friday, July 16, 2010

Ladies' Fashions for July 1813

Friday, July 16, 2010
Loretta reports:

The ladies of 1813 are cooler, I would think, than the gentleman Susan showed us yesterday.  I love the “to display perhaps rather too much of the bosom,” etc.  They don’t usually editorialize—except about French fashions.

PLATE 5. — MORNING WALKING DRESS.
A CAMBRIC or jaconot muslin round robe, with long sleeves and falling collar, trimmed with a plaiting of net, or edged with lace, finished at the feet with a border of needle-work. A Cossack mantle of Pomona green-shot sarsnet, lined throughout with white silk, and bordered with a double row of Chinese binding, the ends finished with rich correspondent tassels, and a cape formed of double and deep vandyke lace. A provincial poke bonnet, of yellow quilted satin; ribband to correspond with the mantle, puffed across the crown, and tied under the chin; a small cluster of flowers placed on the left side, similar to those on the small lace cap which is seen beneath.  Parasol and shoes the colour of the mantle, and gloves a pale tan colour.

PLATE 6.— EVENING OR FULL DRESS COSTUME.
A round robe of pale jonquil or canary-coloured crape, worn over a white satin slip; short sleeves composed of the shell-scallopped lace and satin, decorated with bows on the shoulders, and formed so as to display perhaps rather too much of the bosom, back, and shoulders; a broad scallopped lace finishes the robe at the feet, above which is placed a double row of plaited ribband, and a diamond clasp confines the waist in front. A Prussian helmet cap of canary-coloured sarsnet, frosted with silver, diadem and tassels to correspond; a full plume of curled ostrich feathers, inclining towards one side of the helmet; the hair divided in front of the forehead, and in loose curls on each side, with a single stray ringlet falling on the left shoulder. A cross of diamonds, suspended from a gold chain, ornaments the throat and bosom—ear-rings and bracelets to suit. Slippers of canary-coloured satin, trimmed with silver. Gloves of French kid; fan of carved ivory. An occasional scarf or shawl of white lace.


From the Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions and politics.  Authors Rudolph Ackermann, Frederic Shober.  Printed, for R. Ackermann, by L. Harrison, 1813

8 comments:

Mme.Tresbeau said...

Very pretty! The details in the descriptions are marvelous.

LorettaChase said...

I agree, Mme. Tresbeau!--The loving details about the dress, as well as the jewelry and hair are delicious--and I am crazy about this daring yellow evening dress.

grandmem said...

what is it, i ask, that makes just looking at the picture and reading the description make me want to scamper upstairs to the library and pull down a Heyer novel from the shelf?

Miss Darcy said...

Marvelous. Proves there was much more to regency era fashion than plain white dresses.

Anonymous said...

grandmem, Heyer lifted her description of dresses verbatim from contemporary fashion magazines. You'll recognise it when you start rereading.

Jane O said...

Given the recent heat, a muslin round dress seems very appealing. I wouldn't mind a parasol either.

Finegan Antiques said...

Very enticing and sultry but I'm not too sure whether they are any cooler?

Donna

Felicity Flower said...

I'd like one of those parasols, too. Very pretty!

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